Loud Colors

the art of cory jaeger-kenat

About Cory

My mind is always restless, jamming things together that really shouldn't fit, but somehow do. Subjects that meander onto the canvas include housewives, old lovers, junkmail, angels, everyday objects around the suburban home, fussy hats from the '50s, mom and pop businesses, and mythology (with a modern twist.) I was an odd little kid, and now I'm an odd adult, and my art seems determined to tattle this about me.

Although I paint in a wildly diverse range of styles, essentially I'm looking for a new idiom for the American Dream and the suburbia I grew up in. Old black and white movies shock me at times because they are like watching scenes from another, more genteel, planet. This strangeness is endlessly compelling to me. Nostalgia, criticism, the sensuality of thick paint and vivid color, and a wacked sense of humor are all elements that I bring to the easel.

Although many of my artworks are straight-forward pieces of whimsy, my main goal is to create art that looks like it tumbled right out of a pretty, but slightly scary, dream. A dream where you fell asleep on the couch in front of reruns of "Leave It To Beaver".

I think of myself as a surrealist, and someone who discloses aspects of my personal life in the manner of Frida Kahlo. Other influences include Wayne Thiebaud, Phillip Perlstein, Duane Keiser, along with local artists and instructors, John Pollock and Neil Jussila.

For many years, I followed the conventional art career route. My work has been represented in such Montana galleries as the Toucan Gallery of Billings and Sutton West of Missoula. Other works were shown in such regional venues as the Missoula Art Museum, the Myrna Loy Center, the Kalispell Regional Medical Center, the Butte Arts Chateau, the Custer County Art Center, the Exit Gallery, and the Nicolaysen Art Museum, to name a few. In 2001, my solo show "Pressed Beneath a Heavy Sky" garnered grant funds from the Barbara Deming Memorial Fund in New York City. Another exhibition, entitled "Men", was featured at the Yellowstone Art Museum in 2003, also in Billings, Montana. However, always the unruly woman and a bit of a control freak, I finally decided that I needed my career to be more in my own hands, and currently sell my art privately out of my own studio.